Effects of emotional intelligence and self-leadership on students’ coping with stress

Yefei Wang1, Guangrong Xie2, Xilong Cui2
1The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, and Hunan University of Chinese Medicine , Central South University and Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, People’s Republic of China
2The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Wang, Y., Xie, G., & Cui, X. (2016). Effects of emotional intelligence and self-leadership on students’ coping with stress. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 44(5), 853-864.

Volume 44 Issue 5 | e5351 | Published: June 2016 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2016.44.5.853

Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Author Contact

We examined the impacts of emotional intelligence and self-leadership on coping with stress, and assessing the mediating roles that positive affect and self-efficacy play in this process. Participants were 575 students at 2 Chinese universities, who completed measures of coping with stress, self-leadership, emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, and positive affect. The structural equation model analysis results indicated that self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between emotional intelligence and active coping, as we had predicted. Further, self-leadership had a direct effect on active coping. However, positive affect and self-efficacy did not mediate the relationship between self-leadership and coping with stress. Implications are discussed in terms of theoretical contributions and interventions for coping with stress.

Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.