Contingencies of self-worth moderate the effect of specific self-esteem on self-liking or self-competence

Liuna Geng1, Tao Jiang1
1Department of Psychology, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Nanjing University, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Geng, L. , & Jiang, T. (2013). Contingencies of self-worth moderate the effect of specific self-esteem on self-liking or self-competence. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 41, 95-108.

Volume 41 Issue 1 | e2745 | Published: February 2013 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2013.41.1.95

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In this study we examined whether or not contingencies of self-worth (CSW) moderated the effect of specific self-esteem on self-liking or self-competence. Chinese university students (N = 210) completed the Chinese version of the Contingencies of Self-worth Scale (Crocker, Luhtanen, Cooper, & Bouvrette, 2003; translated into Chinese by Cheng & Kwan, 2008), the Chinese version of the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965; translated into Chinese by Wang, Wang, & Ma, 1999), and our own adaptation for this study of the Self-attribution Questionnaire (Pelham & Swann, 1989) to assess self-liking, self-competence, global self-esteem, 6 domains of CSW consisting of others’ approval, appearance, academic competence, competition, family support, and virtue, and specific self-esteem in these same 6 domains. Results showed that CSW did not have a moderating effect on the relationship between specific self-esteem and global self-esteem in the 6 domains. However, when we classified self-esteem into 2 distinct categories of self-liking and self-competence, we found that there were moderator effects of CSW between specific self-esteem and either self-liking or self-competence in 3 of the 6 domains. The different moderator effects in the 6 domains are discussed.

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