The relationships among recruitment channels, understanding of prospective job, job performance, and turnover intention among Taiwanese kindergarten teachers

Yi-Gean Chen1, Jao-Nan Cheng2
1Department of Early Childhood Caring and Education, Chung Hwai University of Medical Technology, Taiwan
2Department of Education, National Taitung University, Taiwan
Cite this article:  Chen, Y., & Cheng, J. (2012). The relationships among recruitment channels, understanding of prospective job, job performance, and turnover intention among Taiwanese kindergarten teachers. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 40, 93-104.

Volume 40 Issue 1 | e2391 | Published: January 2012 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2012.40.1.93

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Private Taiwanese kindergarten management personnel contend that it is difficult to attract students; and that they must perform better than public kindergartens to recruit and retain teachers. The focus in this study was to determine the best way to recruit and retain teachers with superior performances. We surveyed private teachers from 23 cities and counties in Taiwan, obtaining 732 valid samples. The results show that contemporary teachers have more education, are younger, and tend to focus on urbanized job searches through formal channels, such as newspapers, network bulletins, posters, and human resource banks. The extent of understanding the prospective job is a primary factor in predicting teachers’ performance and satisfaction, which can decrease teachers’ turnover intentions. Teachers recruited through formal channels had higher turnover intentions; however, their job performances showed no significant differences compared to informal channels, which suggests that understanding a prospective job can predict teachers’ performance, satisfaction, and turnover intentions. Therefore, management should design a system that can provide a clear understanding of a prospective job.
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