An application of belief-importance theory with reference to the Big Five and trait emotional intelligence

K. V. Petrides1
1University College London, United Kingdom
Cite this article:  Petrides, K. V. (2010). An application of belief-importance theory with reference to the Big Five and trait emotional intelligence. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 38(5), 697-710.

Volume 38 Issue 5 | e2018 | Published: June 2010 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2010.38.5.697

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In this article the basic principles of belief-importance (belimp) theory are described, according to which it is hypothesized that personality traits confer a propensity to perceive convergences and divergences between an individual’s belief that he/she can attain certain goals and the importance that he/she places on these goals. Belief and importance are conceptualized as 2 coordinates, together defining the belimp plane. Within the belimp plane 4 distinct quadrants can be identified (hubris, motivation, depression, and apathy) and in the present study (N = 532) the hypothesis is tested that these broadly correspond to the personality dimensions of trait emotional intelligence, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and introversion. Twelve specific hypotheses were advanced, of which 10 were fully borne out by the data and 2 partially. The results are interpreted with emphasis on the theoretical and practical advantages of belimp theory.

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