Physiological inequalites do not result in psychological inequalities in vision field: Evidence from a test of visual selective attention

Xufeng Liu1, Jing Lu2, Jing-jing Gong3, Shengjun Wu1, Wei Wang1
1Fourth Military Medical University, People’s Republic of China
2The General Hospital of the People’s Liberation Army, People’s Republic of China
3The Military General Hospital of Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Liu, X., Lu, J., Gong, J.-j., Wu, S., & Wang, W. (2010). Physiological inequalites do not result in psychological inequalities in vision field: Evidence from a test of visual selective attention. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 38(3), 405-414.

Volume 38 Issue 3 | e1986 | Published: April 2010 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2010.38.3.405

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It is well known that there are some characteristics of physiological inequality among vision fields. But, based on many studies, this inequality does not lead to psychological inequalities. Our aim was to assess directly the effect of vision field (foveal, parafoveal, peripheral) on irrelevant distractors’ rejection of selective attention and to determine whether or not the physiological inequalities of different vision fields bring out psychological inequalities. Results showed that there were significant differences in reaction time and error rate among 3 vision fields, but no distractor effect. Results demonstrated that perception processing efficiency was not balanced among the 3 types of vision, but does have a similar function of distractor rejection.

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