Are obsessive beliefs and interpretative bias of intrusions predictors of obsessive compulsive symptomatology? A study with a Turkish sample

Ozlem Cagin1, Ihsan Dag2
1Okan University, Turkey
2Hacettepe University, Trinidad and Tobago
Cite this article:  Cagin, O., & Dag, I. (2009). Are obsessive beliefs and interpretative bias of intrusions predictors of obsessive compulsive symptomatology? A study with a Turkish sample. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 37(3), 355-364.

Volume 37 Issue 3 | e1834 | Published: April 2009 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2009.37.3.355

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The aims of the present study were to investigate the cross-cultural utility of the Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire (OBQ) and the Interpretation of Intrusions Inventory (III) both developed by the Obsessive Compulsive Cognitions Working Group, 1997, 2001, 2003, 2005) with college students. Following factor analysis of the OBQ − unlike the original structure found by the Obsessive Compulsive Cognitions Working Groups − threat perception and responsibility emerged as separate factors. Analysis of the III resulted in a 3-factor solution showing that theoretically derived subscales also differed empirically. Moderate to high intercorrelations were found between the subscales of both the OBQ and III and with the total score. Predictors of obsessive compulsive symptomatology and its subtypes were found to differ and results of the study provided support for the heterogeneity hypothesis of OCD.

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