Determinants of self-handicapping strategies in sport and their effects on athletic performance

Guillaume Coudevylle1, Kathleen A. Martin Ginis2, Jean-Pierre Famose3
1University of Montpellier 1, France
2McMaster University, Canada
3Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, France
Cite this article:  Coudevylle, G., Martin Ginis, K. A., & Famose, J.-P. (2008). Determinants of self-handicapping strategies in sport and their effects on athletic performance. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 36(3), 391-398.

Volume 36 Issue 3 | e1710 | Published: April 2008 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2008.36.3.391

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The purpose of this study was to examine self-efficacy and self-esteem as predictors of claimed and behavioral self-handicapping, and to compare the relationship between behavioral and claimed self-handicaps and athletic performance. A total of 31 basketball players participated in the study. Claimed self-handicaps were significantly negatively correlated with self-esteem whereas behavioral self-handicapping was significantly negatively correlated with self-efficacy. Performance was negatively correlated with behavioral self-handicapping, but was not correlated with claimed self-handicapping. These findings reinforce the conceptual distinction between claimed and behavioral self-handicaps by demonstrating that the two strategies are indeed related to different factors and that they have different consequences for performance.

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