Why educational innovations fail: An individual difference perspective

Jeremy E. C. Genovese1
1Cleveland State University, United States
Cite this article:  Genovese, J. (2005). Why educational innovations fail: An individual difference perspective. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 33, 569-578.

Volume 33 Issue 6 | e1418 | Published: September 2005 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2005.33.6.569

Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Author Contact

Educational innovations often burst onto the scene and are widely adopted. Later they are abandoned in frustration and disillusionment in favor of some new nostrum. In this paper the argument is made that this problem is rooted in the failure of researchers to control for important individual difference variables, such as personality. Two educational movements are examined. One, operant instruction, was popular in the past but is currently out of fashion. The other, cooperative learning, is a current favorite of many educators. Cooperative learning has been widely embraced as a superior teaching method, but a note of caution is sounded and it is suggested that because most educational research does not control for individual differences sweeping conclusions about the universal superiority of any instructional innovation must be considered suspect.


Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.