Gender and self-perceptions of social power

Rebecca S. Powers1, Christa Reiser1
1East Carolina University, United States
Cite this article:  Powers, R., & Reiser, C. (2005). Gender and self-perceptions of social power. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 33, 553-568.

Volume 33 Issue 6 | e1417 | Published: September 2005 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2005.33.6.553

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Using data from undergraduates we found that financial resources, intelligence, and having responsibility were important sources of social power. Consistent with traditional gender norms, women were more likely than were men to perceive social power from emotional intimacy, social skills, and parenting. Men were more likely than were women to perceive having a lot of social power due to physical strength and social status. Unexpected was that more men than women chose sexuality as a source of power. An awareness of gender stratification was found in the reports that “women in general” do not have a lot of social power and women were more likely than were men to say that “men in general” had a lot of
social power.


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