Influence of sense of power on epidemic control policy compliance

Ping Yuan1, Fanghui Ju2, Yuan Cheng2, Yanbin Liu2
1Logistics and e-Commerce College, Zhejiang Wanli University, People’s Republic of China
2Business School, NingboTech University, People’s Republic of China
Cite this article:  Yuan, P., Ju, F., Cheng, Y., & Liu, Y. (2021). Influence of sense of power on epidemic control policy compliance. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 49(9), e10555.

Volume 49 Issue 9 | e10555 | Published: September 2021 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.10555

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Incidences of noncompliance with COVID-19 prevention and control policies have occurred worldwide, increasing the risk to public safety and making epidemic control more difficult. We applied the approach–inhibition theory of power perception to investigate the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions of the relationship between individuals’ power perception and their prevention and control policy compliance. This study collected data from 303 participants in 45 counties (districts) spanning one province in China. Results show that individuals’ sense of power was negatively related to their prevention and control policy compliance, with risk perception mediating and group policy control moderating this relationship. The findings provide a reference for assessing the effectiveness and relevance of government epidemic prevention and control. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

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