Individual differences in adult crying: The role of attachment styles

Anja J. Laan1, Marcel A. L. M. van Assen2, Ad J. J. M. Vingerhoets3
1Reinier van Arkel Groep, Netherlands
2Department of Methodology and Statistics, Tilburg University, Netherlands
3Clinical Psychology Section, Tilburg University, Netherlands
Cite this article:  Laan, A. J., van Assen, M. A. L. M., & Vingerhoets, A. J. J. M. (2012). Individual differences in adult crying: The role of attachment styles. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 40(3), 453-472.

Volume 40 Issue 3 | e2505 | Published: April 2012 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2012.40.3.453

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We carried out 2 studies to evaluate the relationship between attachment style and crying in adults. Data were collected from 2 independent large samples, measuring as 2 different operationalizations crying in general and in response to music. The results in both studies showed a consistent pattern. As anticipated, the group with a dismissive attachment style cried less than the other groups, and the preoccupied attachment style group cried more intensely than the secure group. The preoccupied and fearful attachment style groups reported the most negative emotions while crying, whereas the secure group reported more crying over positive emotions. These results show that attachment style is a determinant of adult crying behavior.
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